Lights dating rob dyer


30-Oct-2019 17:55

contributed the telephone line, and Nashville’s Rock City Construction Co.charged a nominal

contributed the telephone line, and Nashville’s Rock City Construction Co.charged a nominal $1.00 fee for general contracting services. Jones and son Bruce Jones completed the plans and engineering drawings for a reduced fee.[8] Dyer’s Nashville Bridge Company built the five ton, twenty-four-foot revolving dome of one-quarter inch steel for the telescope and the twenty-two-foot steel planetarium dome for the auditorium.[9] Local well-digger G. Anderson contributed fifty feet of what was originally designed to be a 200-foot well.After Barnard’s departure from Vanderbilt, the university remained proud of its early association with E. The Barnard Observatory, named by the Vanderbilt Board of Trust in 1942, was razed in 1952 and its telescopes placed in storage.The six-inch telescope, now known as the Barnard telescope, remained in storage until 1973, when it was installed in the dome of the Stevenson Center on the Vanderbilt University campus.The donation of the fused-quartz disk had helped to renew the university’s interest in its astronomy program.[5] Seyfert began his campaign by giving lectures on astronomy and the proposed observatory to various civic groups.Three years later, after hearing Seyfert speak at a Rotary Club meeting, Arthur J.

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contributed the telephone line, and Nashville’s Rock City Construction Co.

charged a nominal $1.00 fee for general contracting services. Jones and son Bruce Jones completed the plans and engineering drawings for a reduced fee.[8] Dyer’s Nashville Bridge Company built the five ton, twenty-four-foot revolving dome of one-quarter inch steel for the telescope and the twenty-two-foot steel planetarium dome for the auditorium.[9] Local well-digger G. Anderson contributed fifty feet of what was originally designed to be a 200-foot well.

.00 fee for general contracting services. Jones and son Bruce Jones completed the plans and engineering drawings for a reduced fee.[8] Dyer’s Nashville Bridge Company built the five ton, twenty-four-foot revolving dome of one-quarter inch steel for the telescope and the twenty-two-foot steel planetarium dome for the auditorium.[9] Local well-digger G. Anderson contributed fifty feet of what was originally designed to be a 200-foot well.After Barnard’s departure from Vanderbilt, the university remained proud of its early association with E. The Barnard Observatory, named by the Vanderbilt Board of Trust in 1942, was razed in 1952 and its telescopes placed in storage.The six-inch telescope, now known as the Barnard telescope, remained in storage until 1973, when it was installed in the dome of the Stevenson Center on the Vanderbilt University campus.The donation of the fused-quartz disk had helped to renew the university’s interest in its astronomy program.[5] Seyfert began his campaign by giving lectures on astronomy and the proposed observatory to various civic groups.Three years later, after hearing Seyfert speak at a Rotary Club meeting, Arthur J.

In 1943, the mirror was already fifteen years old and was located in a barn at the former family farm in Eldora, New Jersey, with the mounting in another location.[3] Elliott, a professor in Harvard’s Department of Government and Vanderbilt alumnus, contacted Vanderbilt’s Chancellor Oliver C. Carmichael responded with interest in the donation of the mirror, yet admitted the university’s reluctance to accept the gift due to the lack of a suitable building on the campus to house the telescope.

In all, eighty firms and foundations were involved in the construction of the observatory, some donating specific services, others donating time or materials, including sand and gravel, concrete blocks, bricks, reinforcing steel, electrical materials, doors, glass, hardware, and a large septic tank.

Oman Construction Company built the road to the site in memory of John Oman, Jr., while the Du Pont Co.

To help alleviate some of these concerns, Carmichael suggested establishing a time-limit for the donation; the university would construct a building for the telescope by five years after the end of the war.

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The Ferguson sisters agreed to the terms and asked Vanderbilt to go ahead and take possession of the gift, to which the university agreed.On March 16, 1944, Carmichael wrote to Elma Ferguson confirming Vanderbilt’s receipt of all of the various parts of the donation, including the mirror and mountings. Seyfert joined the physics and astronomy department of Vanderbilt University in 1946.